You give music a bad name…

Anyone hear the latest Jon Bon Jovi rant? That’s right – he accuses Steve Jobs of “…personally responsible for killing the music business.” Now, I think I’m a rational person, so I continued reading to get clarification.

Rocker Jon Bon Jovi, whose band soared to prominence with its 1986 album Slippery When Wet, reminisced in the Sunday Times Magazine about his days as a kid in New Jersey, falling in love with music — and ripped Apple CEO Steve Jobs for taking that opportunity away from a new generation of listeners.

So, what Jon is attempting to say here is that the music industry was doing just fine until iTunes came along and ruined the experience. Sorry, Jon, but this ultimately shows how much of an idiot you are. Before iTunes created legal music downloading, the music industry was suffering because people were downloading free MP3s off of Napster and similar services. Nobody got any money and music spread like wildfire. Why aren’t you complaining about that? So, it seems to me you should be thanking Steve Jobs for stopping (some of) the bleeding.

“Kids today have missed the whole experience of putting the headphones on, turning it up to 10, holding the jacket, closing their eyes and getting lost in an album; and the beauty of taking your allowance money and making a decision based on the jacket, not knowing what the record sounded like, and looking at a couple of still pictures and imagining it,” he said (via MSN), thinking back to his record buying days. Then came the less fanciful: the blame.

“God, it was a magical, magical time. I hate to sound like an old man now, but I am, and you mark my words, in a generation from now people are going to say: ‘What happened?’ Steve Jobs is personally responsible for killing the music business.”

So, what Jon is saying here is, he misses the days where kids ponied up what little money they had to blindly buy an entire album that, if you were lucky, had 2-3 good songs on it (but typically only had one). Jon, stop showing your stupidity here. We can still turn up the volume to “10.” You definitely can’t be referring to sound quality because cassette tapes were certainly not top notch and CDs usually revealed the (lack of) quality of original studio recordings back then. We can still close our eyes and get lost in an album (though usually we run out screaming how horrible it is). So, all I am hearing is an old man who is sad that people now only pay 99¢ – $1.29 for one or two songs they like rather than being forced to buy a whole album and “hold a jacket.”

In conclusion, Jon, STFU. Your music career is “living on a prayer” now.


Bon Jovi: ‘Steve Jobs Is Personally Responsible For Killing The Music Business’

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4 Responses to You give music a bad name…

  1. CVernon says:

    Let’s face it, you sound like someone who would find reasons to dislike Jon Bon Jovi even if you agreed with something he said. How is ‘Your career is living on a prayer now’ anything but an ignorant soundbyte itself? What makes you the judge of relevance?

    When people say albums have only 2-3 good songs, they sound just as indignantly stupid as you think JBJ sounds. I’ve found plenty of albums that have great songs throughout, and if I only know one song initially, it takes just a little bit more effort and respect to sit down and become acquainted with the rest of the album.
    Jon Bon Jovi has had albums like these too. You can shit all over my music memories and say that he’s irrelevant because not enough people around you listen to BJ, but I have a different experience.
    And I’m sure you’ll probably just continue to bring out the tired party line that he only has ‘Livin on a Prayer’ which couldn’t be farther from the truth and makes you just as ignorant as you think his view of Jobs is. Whatever, it’s not like the presence of iTunes will make you go and seek out other Bon Jovi songs one can conveniently buy.

    If Napster made people get music illegally, people are STILL doing it even with the presence of iTunes. Except iTunes makes it easier to ignore that one can steal music just as much today– HELLO MEDIAFIRE AND RAPIDSHARE– as before iTunes, but pretend that they are actually buying songs for 0.99. Songs without a lyrics booklet and without the need to sit and respect the rest of the album.

    Again, whatever. When you hate someone you hate them.

    • Take To Task says:

      Let’s face it, you sound like someone who would find reasons to dislike Jon Bon Jovi even if you agreed with something he said. How is ‘Your career is living on a prayer now’ anything but an ignorant soundbyte itself? What makes you the judge of relevance?

      Well, when I can compare the type of people who want to see Bon Jovi with the type of people who want to see Neil Diamond — only diehard fans from back in the day are going — I can safely say the career is coming to an end. It doesn’t make them bad musicians. It means their mainstream career is over and, in Bon Jovi’s case, he’s attempting to make himself relevant by attacking a subject that makes him look foolish, greedy, and desperate.

      When people say albums have only 2-3 good songs, they sound just as indignantly stupid as you think JBJ sounds. I’ve found plenty of albums that have great songs throughout, and if I only know one song initially, it takes just a little bit more effort and respect to sit down and become acquainted with the rest of the album.

      I’ve given numerous albums a chance. I find, with some albums, there are many gems that don’t get radio play. However, let’s not pretend that’s the norm. I’ve been listening to music long enough to know that most albums are 1-3 good songs at best and the rest is filler.

      Jon Bon Jovi has had albums like these too. You can shit all over my music memories and say that he’s irrelevant because not enough people around you listen to BJ, but I have a different experience.

      I know a lot of people who listen to Bon Jovi, but he still makes himself look completely stupid for his comments.

      You apparently missed the point of why I bashed Bon Jovi. Don’t be blinded by your inability to throw out your “New Jersey” jean jacket after all these years. He made himself look stupid by bashing the one online thing that attempts to save the digital music industry. I’ll pay for songs I want to hear, but I don’t see why I should have to buy a whole album, when most albums are crap.

      JBJ is just being a giant crybaby and wants people to pay $15 – $22 for an album with 2 good songs (or remixes of old songs) rather than 99 cents a song. He should just sing his songs, go touring, and STFU about iTunes unless he prefers 100% of the alternative (theft via file-sharing).

      • CVernon says:

        I didn’t miss *much*. Your rant is dripping with derision of someone you think is uncool to like, ready to pounce and call him only fit for females, whose musical tastes are apparently inferior. Are you kidding me? If your point is that Jon Bon Jovi looks stupid for trashing Jobs, then don’t say he’s lucky females who make their kids’ listen to them are the only reason he can still make money.

        “wants people to pay $15 – $22 for an album with 2 good songs (or remixes of old songs) rather than 99 cents a song. ”

        I don’t care what he ‘wants’. If you pay 99 cents and don’t give an entire album a chance, how can people repeatedly claim there are only 2 good songs in it? “Previewing” doesn’t do anything. This doesn’t make iTunes the evil that JBJ [likely misquotedly] claimed, but it’s not the ultimate authority on all things legal-music either. He has a point about holding an album, people who love books are facing the same kind of anxiety right now, except with Kindles etc it’s harder to ruin a book by downloading only the chapter you like.

        Jon Bon Jovi is missing one point here- people don’t have enough money to buy a truckload of albums at the risk they won’t like some of them. These days that is what Mediafire does for me. Not iTunes’ ability to ‘preview’. All iTunes provides is another excuse to complain about how ‘back in the day you had to buy a whole album to get one good song’ which sounds just as old-fart as if JBJ were to rant about the entire internet.

        “Well, when I can compare the type of people who want to see Bon Jovi with the type of people who want to see Neil Diamond ”

        Okay so you had to choose Neil Diamond instead of whichever man’s man rock band playing the state fair circuit, I get it.
        Yes in some areas they are definitely nostalgia-only, but not elsewhere, especially in places that haven’t had Bon Jovi overkill in the last decade like the States have had. But then in the States we are also quick to take pride in following everything the media says, and someone who functions pretty much outside the media like Bon Jovi are completely invisible. They are just as invisible as many of the artists Pitchfork or Popmatters will complain don’t get enough attention. It’s not like iTunes doesn’t have a front page that prominently features Taylor Swift’s mug, after all.

        Of course BJ have already become rich and successful decades ago under another music model, that unfortunately means they’ve missed the boat on some of those potential ‘new music fans’ ever parting with 0.99 for one of their less known ‘album gems’ that would actually show they are not all bad or uncool or only fit for those lame moms.

  2. Take To Task says:

    Truth is — females my age and older are the true demographic for Bon Jovi at this point. I cannot find many males who will readily admit to listening to or liking Bon Jovi. Doesn’t mean they don’t exist, but it certainly shows the defined demographic. Back in 1986, Bon Jovi appealed to males and females (boys and girls, to be specific). As for today’s children, the only children listening to Bon Jovi and like him are generally children of parents (read: mothers) who listen to Bon Jovi. It is what it is.

    You’re right that albums *should* be given a chance, but the music industry — artists included — have burned their bridges there. I’ve paid too many dollars in my youth on garbage with one good song.

    It’s unlikely Bon Jovi was misquoted. He’s a giant crybaby and wants his mundane music to be purchased as a bundle. He also wouldn’t be alone in wishing the “good old days” of nickel-and-diming consumers was still going on.

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